Boston may have fewer gun deaths and lower teen smoking rates than the average for U.S. cities, but has higher-then-average numbers of people dying of accidental opioid overdoses and people diagnosed with HIV, according to a new report.

The numbers come from Big Cities Health Coalition, a group of 2,800 local governmental health departments that compiles health stats for the biggest cities in the U.S., using an array of state surveys and databases.

When compared to U.S. averages — which include…